Network TV gets it wrong again

As I was looking for information , the latest episode of The Mentalist, I found that CBS is screwing up. They are trying to create their own online viewing site. The failure is how they plan to monetize the project.

You may all know about Hulu.com, an online TV station. They have chosen to show short ads in a way that we all are familiar with, inline with the video and spread out during it. CBS has decided to give you credits that you earn by watching ads. You can then cash in those credits and watch the episodes they decide to offer.

On the surface this seems like a interesting idea, you watch a bunch of ads and then get to watch the show you want, providing they offer it. CBS is making it a chore you have to do if you want to see your favorite show.

Except for those silly people that think these shows are magically made, we realize that in order to have a good free show it must be paid for by advertising. Making it a job to get to your desired story will only drive away the viewers. This needs to be as easy as turning on the TV, in fact I suspect that it will be just like turning on the TV, the roku box is an example of what is coming.

In the end if CBS and others like them want to be a online destination for all things video and make so money then all of them need to remember that your customer will go where the selection of content is greater and easier to watch.

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3 Responses to Network TV gets it wrong again

  1. rayvandiest says:

    You make sense, Twidget, I own a Roku player,and find much of Netflix's content not available to the black box/instant viewing queue. I wonder what other content Roku could access for free….could be a dumb thought. This is America.
    I have another question. Can you explain the technology behind so-called 'Enhanced Reality' print pages? See story at Esquire Magazine: http://mashable.com/2009/10/30/esquire-augmente

  2. rayvandiest says:

    You make sense, Twidget, I own a Roku player,and find much of Netflix's content not available to the black box/instant viewing queue. I wonder what other content Roku could access for free….could be a dumb thought. This is America.
    I have another question. Can you explain the technology behind so-called 'Enhanced Reality' print pages? See story at Esquire Magazine: http://mashable.com/2009/10/30/esquire-augmente

  3. Anonymous says:

    You make sense, Twidget, I own a Roku player,and find much of Netflix’s content not available to the black box/instant viewing queue. I wonder what other content Roku could access for free….could be a dumb thought. This is America.
    I have another question. Can you explain the technology behind so-called ‘Enhanced Reality’ print pages? See story at Esquire Magazine: http://mashable.com/2009/10/30/esquire-augmented-reality/

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